Art & Design

Art, Animation, Digital Art, Photography, Art News, Drawing & Illustrations, Pop & Modern Art, Body Art, Fiber Art, Comic Book & Graphic Novels, Design, Modern Art

Entertainment

Celebrities, Photos, Wallpapers, Humor, Photo Blog, Sports, Video Games, Videos, Games, Cinema, Theatre, Previews, Reviews, PC Games

Lifestyle

Business, Finance, Environment, Food, Health, Home, Garden, Outdoors, Personal, Family, Pets, Philosophy, Literature, Real Estate, Religion, Travel

Music

MP3, Classical, Carnatic, Hindustani, Instrumental, Vocal, Light Music, Fusion, Folk Music, Devotional, Ghazals, Indipop, Patriotic, Qawwali, Remix, Tamil, Hindi, Malayalam, Telugu, Albums, Live Events, Copy Cats

Technology

Computer, Internet, Marketing/SEO, Webdesign, Science, Architecture, Automotive, Academics, Blog

Home » Featured, Inspiration, Technology

Bill Gates’ advice to Harvard University graduates

Submitted by on Friday, 4 December 2009No Comment

  • Microsoft founder
    at the Commencement Address, Harvard University

    Read these inspiring excerpts from the Microsoft Founder’s    Commencement Address at Harvard University.

    I’m a bad influence. That’s why I was invited to speak at your graduation. If I had spoken at your orientation, fewer of you might be here today. Harvard was just a phenomenal experience for me. One of my biggest memories of Harvard came in January 1975, when I made a call from Currier House to a company in Albuquerque that had begun making the world’s first personal computers. I offered to sell them software. From that moment, I worked day and night on this little extra credit project that marked the end of my college education and the beginning of a remarkable journey with Microsoft.

    I learned a lot here at Harvard about new ideas in economics and politics. But humanity’s greatest advances are not in its discoveries – but in how those discoveries are applied to reduce inequity. Whether through democracy, strong public education, quality health care, or broad economic opportunity – reducing inequity is the highest human achievement.

    You graduates are coming of age in an amazing time. As you leave Harvard, you have technology that members of my class never had. You have awareness of global inequity, which we did not have. And with that awareness, you likely also have an informed conscience that will torment you if you abandon these people whose lives you could change with very little effort. You have more than we had; you must start sooner, and carry on longer.

    The barrier to change is not too little caring; it is too much complexity. Cutting through complexity to find a solution runs through four predictable stages: determine a goal, find the highest-leverage approach, discover the ideal technology for that approach, and in the meantime, make the smartest application of the technology that you already have — whether it’s something sophisticated, like a drug, or something simpler, like a bednet.

    To turn caring into action, we need to see a problem, see a solution, and see the impact. But if you want to inspire people to participate, you have to show more than numbers; you have to convey the human impact of the work – so people can feel what saving a life means to the families affected.

    Don’t let complexity stop you. Be activists. Take on the big inequities. It will be one of the great experiences of your lives.

    Knowing what you know, how could you not?

    And I hope you will come back here to Harvard 30 years from now and reflect on what you have done with your talent and your energy. I hope you will judge yourselves not on your professional accomplishments alone, but also on how well you have addressed the world’s deepest inequities … on how well you treated people a world away who have nothing in common with you but their humanity.

Source :

Leave your response!

Add your comment below, or trackback from your own site. You can also subscribe to these comments via RSS.

Be nice. Keep it clean. Stay on topic. No spam.

You can use these tags:
<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

This is a Gravatar-enabled weblog. To get your own globally-recognized-avatar, please register at Gravatar.