Art & Design

Art, Animation, Digital Art, Photography, Art News, Drawing & Illustrations, Pop & Modern Art, Body Art, Fiber Art, Comic Book & Graphic Novels, Design, Modern Art

Entertainment

Celebrities, Photos, Wallpapers, Humor, Photo Blog, Sports, Video Games, Videos, Games, Cinema, Theatre, Previews, Reviews, PC Games

Lifestyle

Business, Finance, Environment, Food, Health, Home, Garden, Outdoors, Personal, Family, Pets, Philosophy, Literature, Real Estate, Religion, Travel

Music

MP3, Classical, Carnatic, Hindustani, Instrumental, Vocal, Light Music, Fusion, Folk Music, Devotional, Ghazals, Indipop, Patriotic, Qawwali, Remix, Tamil, Hindi, Malayalam, Telugu, Albums, Live Events, Copy Cats

Technology

Computer, Internet, Marketing/SEO, Webdesign, Science, Architecture, Automotive, Academics, Blog

Home » Interesting Facts

India unveils new rupee symbol

Submitted by on Friday, 6 August 20105 Comments

new indian rupee

Udaya Kumar with his winning design for the Indian rupee symbol. Photograph: Strdel/AFP/Getty Images 

It may look like a melted British Rail sign but it’s hoped that a new symbol for the Indian rupee will signal India’s growing economic strength ‑ and it will be coming soon to a keyboard near you.

The winning design was selected by the Indian cabinet yesterday from a shortlist of five following a national competition.

Measures are already afoot to have the rupee sign declared a computer standard, meaning it could join currencies such as the pound, dollar, euro and yen on keyboards within two years.

“The distinct symbol denotes the robustness of the Indian economy,” India’s information minister, Ambika Soni, said.

References to sums in rupees currently involve spelling out the word (as is the case in the Guardian’s style guide) or giving it the abbreviation Rs or INRs to distinguish it from other Asian countries that use rupees or variations thereof.

“Once accepted, it will stand clear from the clutter of currencies that call themselves rupee or the rupiah,” India’s Telegraph reported.

The winning symbol was the work of Udaya Kumar, a lecture in design at the Indian Institute of Technology in Mumbai. Speaking to the Indian news website Rediff.com he said: “My design is based on the tricolour, with two lines at the top and white space in between. I wanted the symbol for the rupee to represent the Indian flag. It is a perfect blend of Indian and Roman letters: a capital ‘R’ and Devanagari ‘ra’ which represents rupiya, to appeal to international audiences and Indian audiences.”

Michael Johnson, a director at the award-winning London-based design consultancy johnson banks, said the new symbol fitted with other currency signs but lacked imagination.

“I think it’s a B or B plus. Most currency symbols follow an established route now ‑ E for euro, Y for yen, now R for rupee. You could argue that a dynamic emerging economy could have gone for something more unusual and got away with it ‑ I think in the end conservative voices prevailed.”

Source : Guardian.co.uk

India unveils new rupee symbol

Government hopes to signal India’s growing strength with globally recognised currency symbol

new indian rupee Udaya Kumar with his winning design for the Indian rupee symbol. Photograph: Strdel/AFP/Getty ImagesIt may look like a melted British Rail sign but it’s hoped that a new symbol for the Indian rupee will signal India’s growing economic strength ‑ and it will be coming soon to a keyboard near you.

The winning design was selected by the Indian cabinet yesterday from a shortlist of five following a national competition.

Measures are already afoot to have the rupee sign declared a computer standard, meaning it could join currencies such as the pound, dollar, euro and yen on keyboards within two years.

“The distinct symbol denotes the robustness of the Indian economy,” India’s information minister, Ambika Soni, said.

References to sums in rupees currently involve spelling out the word (as is the case in the Guardian’s style guide) or giving it the abbreviation Rs or INRs to distinguish it from other Asian countries that use rupees or variations thereof.

“Once accepted, it will stand clear from the clutter of currencies that call themselves rupee or the rupiah,” India’s Telegraph reported.

The winning symbol was the work of Udaya Kumar, a lecture in design at the Indian Institute of Technology in Mumbai. Speaking to the Indian news website Rediff.com he said: “My design is based on the tricolour, with two lines at the top and white space in between. I wanted the symbol for the rupee to represent the Indian flag. It is a perfect blend of Indian and Roman letters: a capital ‘R’ and Devanagari ‘ra’ which represents rupiya, to appeal to international audiences and Indian audiences.”

Michael Johnson, a director at the award-winning London-based design consultancy johnson banks, said the new symbol fitted with other currency signs but lacked imagination.

“I think it’s a B or B plus. Most currency symbols follow an established route now ‑ E for euro, Y for yen, now R for rupee. You could argue that a dynamic emerging economy could have gone for something more unusual and got away with it ‑ I think in the end conservative voices prevailed.”

5 Comments »

  • Ansary's Website – Blog » India unveils new rupee symbol < IndiaNewsBox Buzz – What's India Talking About said:

    […] more here:  Ansary's Website – Blog » India unveils new rupee symbol Bookmark It Hide Sites $$('div.d25509').each( function(e) { […]

  • DoitStyle-New Star In International B2C Group said:

    […] BlackBerry Log abbreviation listA TO Z HTML REFERENCE GUIDE FOR SEO PROFESSIONALS THE …Ansary's Website Blog India unveils new rupee symbolWhat is the abbreviation for the CAP in a guide price of cars?American Apparel Flex Fleece Zip […]

  • Wordpress Themes said:

    Nice post and this post helped me alot in my college assignement. Gratefulness you on your information.

  • web design india said:

    Thanks for u r information

    its very useful

  • school grants said:

    found your site on del.icio.us today and really liked it.. i bookmarked it and will be back to check it out some more later

Leave your response!

Add your comment below, or trackback from your own site. You can also subscribe to these comments via RSS.

Be nice. Keep it clean. Stay on topic. No spam.

You can use these tags:
<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

This is a Gravatar-enabled weblog. To get your own globally-recognized-avatar, please register at Gravatar.